Thursday, March 16, 2006

Cable Companies call Phone Companies Liars

The National Cable & Telecommunications Association, the national association of cable TV companies like Cox and Time-Warner, is frustrated enough to start talking plainly about their Phone company competition.

Recent days have seen strong signs that a national franchise bill that will put the cable companies at a tremendous disadvantage will float through congress regardless of the opposition of legions of local municipalities and huge cable companies.
“As many of their former and vanquished competitors have experienced, the Bell companies are once again using false and misleading advertising to lobby for special favors that benefit only them,” said Rob Stoddard, Senior Vice President, Communications & Public Affairs for NCTA. “In Washington, DC, they are spending tens of millions on highly negative and demonstrably false advertising. What’s shameful and ironic is that this forms the basis for the Bells’ heavy-handed lobbying for a sweetheart deal.”
Surely the cable companies are self-interested. And surely there is more than a tinge of hypocrisy considering the sorts of false-hoods that Cox is more than willing to pursue. (Everyone in Lafayette and Baton Rouge has seen the latest Cox ads deceptively claiming to have "fiber" networks after EATel and LUS put forward real FTTH plans.)
But it's good to see that people nationally will be hearing what we here in Lafayette know all to well: you can't trust BellSouth and the phone companies.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sounds like LCG has a few in their back pocket as well. Concern that a junior rep was filing the bills, but I hear all the Acadiana delegation is going to join and co-author. Should be a slam dunk repeal.

John said...

Hope you are right about co-sponsorship. I knew folks were asking at least some to co-sponsor but didn't know that that had worked through.

I'm afraid nothing is a slam dunk in this game. We wouldn't want to get overconfident; remember when Iraq was a slam dunk?

http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/04/18/woodward.book/