Sunday, November 11, 2007

$200 PC Available in Lafayette

A Wired blog sez that a $200 Ubuntu Linux PC, sans monitor is now available in Lafayette.

Cool. And it's especially great for Lafayette.

Why great for Lafayette?

This computer and its software packages come very close to being exactly the computer that the Lafayette Digital Divide Committee recommended in the "Bridging the Digital Divide" document.

That study, which became official policy when it was made an ordinance by the city-parish council, recommended a mix of low cost computers, free open source software, and a local portal/server that leveraged the intranet bandwidth the committee recommended LUS make available to its customers. Let's take a look at how that has played out:

The key, and hardest, part of that equation was securing the use of full intranet bandwidth—when the committee first recommended Lafayette adopt that policy there was real doubt that it was technically feasible. In short order such doubt was dispelled. Since that time LUS and the city-parish has fully committed to providing at least 100 megs of intranet bandwidth to every user regardless of how much they spend for internet connectivity. Huval and LUS call this "peer to peer bandwidth." With 100 megs locally available to all users a rich local portal and aggressive use of server-based applications becomes possible. Since much of the computing and handling of large quantities of data can be handled on the network rather than in the users personal computer much less powerful—and hence less expensive—computers can be used.

That brings us back to the subject of todays post: Everex's TC2502 gPC computer. This 'puter is available through WalMart for $200 dollars and Wired's blog carries of list of locations that will stock it that include Lafayette. It is also available over the net from WalMart's online store. It is sold without a monitor but includes mouse, keyboard and a set of speakers. The desktop computer runs a variant of the free Ubuntu Linux operating system called gOS. Also free is a list of installed open source software including OpenOffice, Firefox web browser, Meebo IM, and Skype, GIMP photo software, the Xing DVD and video player, and Rhythmbox music management software. Even more interesting for local digital divide promoters is that it includes icons linking to Google applications like Mail, Documents, Spreadsheets, Calendar, News, and Maps.

Between LUS' solid commitment to lower prices for connectivity (which is now more important than computer cost as a barrier to adoption) Google's online apps, and the emergence of commercially available, low-cost, open source computers like this Everex, the pieces are falling in place for Lafayette to have a digital divide program that will be as unique as the system itself.

2 comments:

Nick Istre said...

Slashdot just reported that the online store has sold out on these systems.

I don't think it we can claim that it was your doing, but the timing was funny...

John said...

Hi Nick,

No I don't think my 600 to a 1000 daily uniques has much of any chance of producing even a blip on WalMart's sales. ;-)

I am happy that it has sold out though. WalMart had a bad experience trying to do something similar so it is nice that this one seems to have worked for all concerned.