Sunday, June 01, 2008

Digital Arts in Louisiana & Lafayette

Here's something that Lafayette ought to get one of: "Tipitinana's Music Coop." Or at least some of this funding for our native equivalent. An article in last week's Advocate describes the concept and its utility:
[Tipitinana's Coops] in New Orleans, Shreveport, Alexandria and now Baton Rouge provide workspace and office and production equipment for musicians and digital artists to help them make more money and fuel the state’s culture industry.

“It’s a job-skills training and economic development project,” said Todd Souvignier, technical director of the Tipitina’s Foundation who has spearheaded the opening of the co-ops.

For $10 a month, the co-ops give members access to technology — from conventional office machines to software such as Pro Tools and Final Cut Pro, “the kind of stuff real musicians need to get their hands on to do some real work.”

Souvignier said 1,200 musicians and digital artists use the various co-ops 12,000 times a year to check e-mail and make phone calls or faxes to book tours or use computers to make press kits, Web sites or MySpace pages.

As I understand it this is pretty close to the concept behind ACFM (Acadiana Center for Film and Media) But where Tipitinia's starts with music and strays to video ACFM starts with film and strays to "media," broadly understood.

Tipitina's appears to be supported by grant funding with a small $10 dollar a month coop membership fee that could do no more than supplement the exterior funding. ACFM appears to impose no fee on users and has at least channels 15 and 16 on cable as farm league placement for the work of folk who do their production using the facilities.

Both concepts are good ideas in as far as they get the tools of production into peoples' hands. There's a lot of belief that the near future holds a lot of potential for media production moving away from the big centers and towards very local, artist and fan-produced works. If that vision is to be realized we'll need lots of places like Tipitinas' Coop and ACFM. It's not enough for a thing to be possible--people have to be able to afford the tools and, even more crucially, find the community of folks that will help the learn how to use the tools well.

For my money, Lafayette could easily support both a Music-facing digital studio and a Video-facing one. You have to think the synergy would be good for both. And, you know, real soon now we'll be getting an in-city network that will open up a 100 megs between local nodes on the LUS network. A Tipitianas or an ACFM could easily put together a "channel" on that kind of bandwidth. Either tap into the multicast stream or download from the growing archival library. It'd be an instant way to make good cultural use of the bandwidth we'll have.


1 comment:

alizia said...

Both of these concepts are good ideas as far as they get the tools of production into peoples' hands. There is a lot of assurance that the forthcoming time will the ability to hold a lot of potential for media production moving away from the big centers and towards very local, artist and fan-produced works.
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alizia
Addiction Recovery Louisiana